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BADGES, PATCHES and other INSIGNIA

Some Canadian Cavalry Regimental Badges

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Some Canadian Cavalry Regimental Badges

Unread postby Marcus K » Fri Jun 30, 2006 9:46 pm

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Badge of the 4th Princess Louise Dragoon Guards.

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Badge of the 12th Manitoba Dragoons.

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Badge of the 14th Canadian Hussars.

Pictures from the Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada.
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Unread postby Marcus K » Sat Jul 01, 2006 2:21 pm

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Badge of the Governor General's Horse Guards.


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Badge of the Royal Canadian Dragoons. The Springbok denotes service in South Africa during the Boer War.

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Badge of the Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians), showing the Shield from the Amorial Bearings of Lord Strathcona.
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Unread postby Laurence Strong » Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:52 am

The Saskatchewan Dragoons

Reserve unit out of the province of Saskatchewan in the Cities of Moose Jaw and Saskatoon, formed as the 95th Regt of Canadian Militia in 1905, Served in WW1 as the 46th Bn, served in WW2 as the "Kings Own Rifle's of Canada" redesignated in 1946 as the "20th (Saskatchewan) Armoured Regiment, attaining it's current designation as the "Saskatchewan Dragoons (20th Armoured Regt) in 1954. That is the crest of the Province of Sask on the badge.

Sergeant Hugh Cairns, who had come to the 46th Battalion from the 65th Battalion, was awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously for his actions at Valenciennes on 1 November 1918. He was the last Canadian to win the Victoria Cross in World War I. The armoury in Saskatoon is named in his memory, as is a street in Valenciennes - the only street in France named after a non-commissioned soldier of a foreign army.
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Unread postby Laurence Strong » Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:53 am

Next the "South Alberta Light Horse". Started life as the Rocky Mountain Rangers in 1885, in 1905 became the 15th Light Horse. Served in WW1 as the 31st Bn. Became the "South Alberta Regiment" in 1920. Fought thru WW2 as the29th Canadian Armoured Recce Regt, before becoming SALH in 1949, Commonly known as "Sally Horse"
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Unread postby Laurence Strong » Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:53 am

Next
The "Royal Canadian Dragoons". It is the most Senior Cavalry regiment in Canada formed in 1883 as the "Cavalry School Corps"., in1887 renamed the "Royal School of Cavalry", before becoming the "RCD's" in 1893.

Battle Honours:

North West Canada 1885, South Africa 1900
The Great War: Festubert 1915, Somme 1916 '18, Bazentin, Pozičres, Flers-Courcelette, Cambrai 1917 '18, St. Quentin, Amiens, Hindenburg Line, St. Quentin Canal, Beaurevoir, Pursuit to Mons, France and Flanders 1915-18
The Second World War: Liri Valley, Gothic Line, Lamone Crossing, Misano Ridge, Sant' Angelo-in-Salute, Fosso Vecchio, Italy 1944-45, Groningen, Bad Zwischenahn, North-West Europe 1945
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Unread postby Laurence Strong » Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:55 am

Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians)

The regiment was one of the last in the British Empire to be created and raised by a private individual. During the Boer War, Donald Alexander Smith, 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, recruited and equipped the cavalry regiment at his own expense for service in South Africa. Many skilled horsemen (cowboys and North West Mounted Police members) enlisted, allowing for a short training period and rapid deployment to Africa. The 537 officers and men, as well as 599 horses, of the new regiment sailed from Halifax on 18 March 1900 and arrived in Cape Town on 10 April.

On 5 July 1900 at Wolwespruit, Standerton, South Africa, a party of Lord Strathcona's Horse (38 in number) came into contact and was engaged at close quarters with a force of 80 of the enemy. When the order was given to retire Sergeant Richardson rode back under very heavy cross-fire, picked up a trooper whose horse had been shot and who was badly wounded and rode with him out of fire. This act of gallantry was performed within 300 yards of the enemy and Sergeant Richardson was himself riding a wounded horse. He earned the Regiments 1st of 3 VC's

After the war, the regiment boarded ship at Cape Town on 20 January 1901 and arrived in London on 14 February. Here they met Lord Strathcona for the first time and were presented their medals by King Edward VII personally. On its return to Canada on 9 March 1901, the Regiment was disbanded. The regiment was recreated as regiment of the Permanent Force in 1909.

In the First World War, the regiment served dismounted during the long static portion of the war, but when the front lines began to move back and forth in 1918, it fought as cavalry again and was one of key units involved in halting Germany's Operation Michael in late March.

Volunteers from the regiment form the Mounted Troop, a ceremonial cavalry troop equipped with scarlet tunics, brass helmets, lances, and sabres. The regiment has the honour of being the only unit other than the Household Cavalry, the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to mount the Queen's Life Guard at Horse Guards in London

The first badge is an older brass on, and the second is current issue
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Unread postby Laurence Strong » Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:57 am

1st Canadian Hussars, could be a WW2 from the shape of it

The 1st Hussars can trace its roots back to the formation of the St. Thomas Troop of Volunteer Militia Cavalry in March of 1856 and the First Troop of Volunteer Militia Cavalry of London in July of the same year. In 1863, these units were renamed to the St. Thomas Troop of Cavalry and the London Troop of Cavalry. both troops were put on active duty in southwestern Ontario in response to the Fenian raid of 1866, but neither had any contact with the invading forces.

The two troops were amalgamated in the aftermath of the 1866 Fenian Raids, forming the St. Thomas and London Squadron of Canada in January of 1867. Both troops of the new squadron were again called into active service during the 1870 Fenian invasion, but again neither saw action.

In May of 1872, the unit was expanded and reorganized to include four additional Cavalry troops, for a total of six troops, becoming the 1st Regiment of Cavalry, headquartered in St. Thomas.


In 1880, the regiment's headquarters was moved to London, where it has remained to this day. The 1st Regiment of Cavalry was renamed in 1888 becoming the 1st Regiment of Cavalry Hussars, and again in 1892 , receiving the title 1st Hussars, which it has retained ever since. In 1896 and 1897, the remaining four troops' numbered designations were replaced with letters and the troops were renamed as squadrons. In February of 1905, the regiment moved into the newly built London Armouries at the corner of Dundas and Waterloo Streets, which it used until 1977. By 1913, 'A' Squadron had moved to London from St. Thomas, 'C' Squadron had moved from Mooretown to Courtright, where it was disbanded, and 'D' Squadron had moved from Kingsville to Amhurstburg, where it was renamed 'C' Squadron after the disbandment of the Courtright squadron.



1st Hussars in South Africa
October of 1899 saw the outbreak of the Second Boer War between the British Empire and the Boer republics of the Orange Free State and the Transvaal Republic.

Although the 1st Hussars did not participate as a unit, 27 of the regiment's members went to South Africa with other units of the Canadian Army.

6 Hussars joined the special service battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry and participated in the engagements at Sunnyside, Paardeberg and the capture of Pretoria.

Another 15 Hussars joined 'A' Squadron, 1st Battalion of the Canadian Mounted Rifles (later re-named the Royal Canadian Dragoons). The 1st Battalion CMR arrived in South Africa in March of 1900 and fought in the region, participating in the March to Pretoria and the Battle of Leliefontein on the Komati River in November of 1900 before returning to Canada.

In 1901, 6 members of the 1st Hussars joined the newly established South African Constabulary.



First World War


Mobilization, Organization and Deployment
As with the Boer War, the 1st Hussars did not participate as a unit.

At the outbreak of the war, some 66 members of the regiment joined the 1st Western Ontario Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force which was raised in late 1914. The Western Ontario Battalion was present at the Second Battle of Ypres.

In November of 1914, the 7th Canadian Mounted Rifles was raised. 'A' Squadron was recruited in London, 'B' Squadron was drew men from Windsor, Sarnia and Amherstburg and 'C' Squadron was raised in Toronto. 'A' Squadron was attached to the 2nd Canadian Division in March of 1915 as the divisional cavalry squadron. In June of 1915, 7 CMR sailed for England. In January of 1916, 'A' Squadron was renamed Special Service Squadron, First (Canadian) Hussars to reflect the unit's roots in 1st Hussars. By mid-May of 1916, the Squadron became part of the Canadian Corps Calvary Regiment, later renamed the Canadian Light Horse, forming 'B' Squadron of the regiment
On 9 October 1918, The Canadian Corps attacked the Germans near the French village of Escaudoevres on the L'Escaut Canal (north-east of Cambrai). By this point, battlefield was becoming more fluid and calvary playing a more important role during operations. On the 9th, the CLH was ordered to occupy two pieces high ground in front 5 Canadian Infantry Brigade's position. Just after noon, 'B' Squadron CLH was ordered forward with 'A' and 'C' Squadrons in support. The troops advanced across the canal and approached a rail line which ran along the ridge on the far bank. As the troops closed on the rail line, machine-guns opened up on the right hitting several men and horses. the situation on the left of the advance developed in a similar fashion with MGs opening up as the troopers crested the rail embankment. One of the German MGs was put out of action allowing a position to be established and Hotchkiss Machine guns set up on the rail embankment. One troop was sent in an attempt to outflank the remaining German MGs, but they were unsuccessful. The position was held and passed on to the 25th Battalion, CEF and the CLH troops retired. 1 Non-commissioned officer was killed and 11 men were wounded in the action which gained 2500 meters of ground and inflicted at least 20 casualties on the Germans and captured 2 German MGs.

The next day the First Hussars would participate in an action that saw the last of the few calvary charges in Canadian history. The Canadian Corps continued to advance on the far bank of the canal. The village of Naves was captured by the 19th Battalion, CEF, which continued on to capture a ridgeline to the east of the village. The objective for 'A' and 'C' Squadrons of the CLH was to capture a portion of sunken road on the ridgeline and continue on to take a hill overlooking the village of Iwuy . 'B' Squadron was held in reserve. 'A' and 'C' Squadrons forded the Erclin River and charged up the hill towards the sunken road. The charge resulted in 23 dead troopers and 66 dead horses, but despite the losses, the hill was taken and held

As the Hundred Day's offensive continued, the 1st Hussars and rest of the CLH found itself often leading the advance, and letting the infantry pass through when resistance was met.

Members of the 1st Hussars also participated in the following actions:

Second Battle of Ypres
Battle of Flers-Courcelette
Battle of Hill 70
Passchendaele


Second World War


Mobilization, Organization and Deployment
"Defence Scheme Number 3" was implemented on September 1, 1939 and saw the raising of 1st Canadian Division, Canadian Active Service Force. The 1st Hussars provided Divisional Cavalry for CASF (1st Division). In December of 1939, the majority of 1st Division sailed for England, but the 1st Hussars stayed behind in London because there were not enough tanks to equip the regiment.

In January 1940, 1st Hussars contributed the Headquarters Squadron and 'C' Squadron to the First Canadian Cavalry Regiment (Mechanised) (1 CCR (M)). ('A' Squadron was mainly supplied by the Royal Canadian Dragoons and 'B' Squadron was filled by members of Lord Strathcona's Horse.). 1 CCR (M) was still part of the 1st Canadian Division. In May 1940, 1 CCR (M) left London for Camp Borden where they trained on the Carden-Loyd Machine Carrier, the Vickers Mk. VIB Light Tank and the Renault FT 17 Light Tank. Although these tanks were obsolete, they served the purpose of training the regiment's members in tactics and vehicle maintenance.

In January 1941, The Squadrons of 1 CCR (M) returned to their respective units as they became mobilised as regiments.

The Canadian Armoured Corps (CAC) was raised in August of 1940 and the 1st Hussars found themselves organised within it. In spring of 1941, 1st Hussars, now the 6th Canadian Armoured Regiment (1st Hussars) (6 CAR), became part of the 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade, which departed to England in October 1941. The regiment took up residance in Aldershot where they continued they're training. In early 1942, 6 CAR received some M3 Lee tanks and Canadian Ram Mk. Is and IIs. The Hussars remained a part of 1 CAB until January 1943, when they were reorganised into the 3rd Canadian Army Tank Brigade along with the The Fort Garry Horse and the Sherbrooke Fusilier Regiment. In July of 1943, 3 CATB was re-designated the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade (2CAB), a designation which remained until the end of the war.

6 CAR continued training in the village of Elstead in southern England before moving to Combined Operations Training Centre in Inverary, Scotland where they prepared for an Amphibious assault. In December of 1943, the First Hussars were introduced to "Duplex Drive" (DD for short) tanks. Innitally the regiment was trained on the Valentine DD, until it was re-equipped with the M4A4 Sherman DD and Sherman Vc "Firefly" in April 1944.

D-Day and Normandy

The DD tanks of the 1st Hussars were amongst the allied forces to come ashore in Normandy. The Hussars were to support the infantry landing on the western half of Juno Beach.

At 0715h, 19 tanks of 'B' Squadron launched their Sherman V DDs from their landing-craft into the English Channel some 4000 meters from shore of Nan Green Beach. Of 'B' Squadron's 19 tanks, 15 made it to shore ahead of the Regina Rifles, whom they were tasked to support.

'A' Squadron launched some of their DDs some ten minuets later then 'B' Squadron, from approximately 1500 meters out and headed towards Mike Beach. Only two of the four LTCs carrying 'A' Squadron were able to launch all their tanks off shore. Of 'A' Squadron's 19 tanks, 10 were launched into the channel with seven of those making it to shore. Five tanks were landed directly onto the beach, and four were stranded on a landing craft which struck a mine. The tanks of 'A' Squadron were to support the Winnipeg Rifles, who were already fighting on the beach when they came ashore.

At the beach, the many of tanks of the 1st Hussars stayed partially submerged just off shore in a hull down position. After dropping they're screens, they began engaging the German antitank guns, machine-gun nests and other strong points, allowing the infantry to break the beach defences and make its way inland. 'A' Squadron made its way inland to the village of Graye-sur-Mer where the Winnipeg Rifles were attempting to capture bridges over the Suelles River. 'B' Squadron helped clear Courseulles-sur-Mer before breaking out into the countryside.

At 0820h, 'C' Squadron's Sherman Vc Fireflys and Sherman IIIs were landed directaly onto Mike Red beach, along with the regimental Headquarters Squadron. By this time, resistance at the beach had been cleared.

After clearing Courseulles-sur-Mer, The regiment made its way inland. South of Reviers, 'B' Squadron encountered a German 88 which knocked out six tanks before being put out of action. Seven Hussar crewmen were killed in the engagement. Due to these losses,'B' squadron was pulled back to the beach after the encounter. As mentioned above, 'A' Squadron moved on to Graye-sur-Mer where the Winnipeg Rifles were fighting to secure the village. 'A' Squadron joined the fight in support of the Winnipegs, along with elements of 'C' squadron who were catching up. After the village was captured, 'C' Squadron pressed on, with 2nd Troop reaching the regiment's objective of the Caen-Bayeux Highway, becoming the only Allied unit to reach its D-Day objective. However, 2nd troop had to pull back, as they were too far ahead of the rest of the force and too few to hold the objective. At dusk, the regiment pulled back to the channel to rest. the 1st Hussars suffered 21 killed, 17 wounded during the actions of D-Day. 'A' Squadron was left with 9 tanks at the end of the day and 'B' Squadron was reduced to 4 tanks.

After D-Day, the 1st Hussars continued to support infantry as it advanced and faced German counter-attacks. On 9 June, the Hussars supported the Canadian Scottish as they re-took Poutot-en-Bessin and engaged panthers of the 1st Batallion, SS-Panzer Regiment 12 (of the 12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend), destroying 6.





Regimental seniority
Despite "1st" in the title, the regiment is not the most senior armoured unit. With the militia reorganization of 1872, the senior or only cavalry regiment within a Militia District adopted the numerical designation of that district. Southwestern Ontario comprised Military District No. 1, hence the original designation as the 1st Regiment of Cavalry. The unit was renamed 1st Hussars in 1892 and because a British mounted unit numbered "1" never existed, it was unnecessary to add a 'Canada' or 'Canadian' modifier. Following the Second World War, because of wartime and earlier conversion to armour of some more senior infantry regiments, the Royal Canadian Armoured Corps decided that seniority would be determined by date of birth, regardless of the Corps in which the unit was raised. Regular Force regiments take precedence, and seniority among themselves by date of birth. 1st Hussars is placed seventh in the order of seniority of militis armoured regiments.

First World War flying ace and recipient of the Victoria Cross and Distinguished Flying Cross, William Avery (Billy) Bishop, was a lieutenant in the regiment before transferring to the Royal Flying Corps.

One of the regiment's greatest claims to fame is that it was the Allied unit that penetrated deepest into Normandy on D-Day.

honours
South Africa, 1900
Arras, 1917
Vimy, 1917
Hindenburg Line
Cambrai, 1918
Pursuit to Mons
Normandy Landing
Le Mesnil-Patry
Caen
Faubourg de Vaucelles
Verričres Ridge–Tilly-la-Campagne
Falaise
Calais, 1944
The Lower Maas
The Rhineland
Apeldoorn

Order of precedence
Preceded by:
12e Régiment blindé du Canada (Milice) 1st Hussars Succeeded by:
The Prince Edward Island Regiment (RCAC)

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Unread postby Laurence Strong » Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:58 am

The reverse
It's how I fiqured out what the badge was.
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Unread postby Laurence Strong » Mon Oct 30, 2006 2:00 am

Next is the 12 Regiment Blinde Canadien, this is an older badge made of brass instead of the more modern alloys;

The 12e Régiment blindé du Canada is a Canadian Forces armoured regiment based in CFB Valcartier, on the outskirts of Quebec City.

Its origins are in The Three Rivers Regiment, a militia (Reserve Force) regiment based in Trois-Rivičres, a town halfway between Montreal and Quebec. Originally formed in 1862, The Three Rivers Regiment, after many name changes, became the 12e Régiment blindé du Canada in 1968. This was a new Regular Force regiment which was created in Valcartier, while a militia unit was left in Trois-Rivičres under the name 12e Régiment blindé du Canada (Milice). The number in the regimental title commemorates The Three Rivers Regiment's title during the Second World War: 12th Armoured Regiment (The Three Rivers Regiment). The Canadian Army traditionally avoided having city or region names in the titles of its Regular Force regiments; this was likely the reason for the 1960s name change.

The 12e Régiment blindé du Canada is called "twelve R-B-C" for short, and affectionately known as the "Twelve Rubber Boot Company" by anglophones in the Canadian Forces.

The regular force regiment comprises three squadrons. A,B and D squadron, who are now all armored reconnaissance squadron.


Battle honours
The Great War: Amiens1, Sibérie 1918-19

The Second World War: Débarquement en Sicile, Grammichele, Piazza Armerina, Valguarnera, Agira, Adrano, Vallée du Troina, Sicile 1943, Termoli, Le Ravin, Ortona, Cassino II, Ligne Gustav, Vallée du Liri, Ligne Hitler, Ligne Trasimene, Arezzo, L'Avance ŕ Florence, Monte La Pieve, Monte Spaduro, Italie 1943-1945, Apeldoorn, Nord-Ouest de L'Europe 1945
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Unread postby Laurence Strong » Mon Oct 30, 2006 2:43 am

Not current, WW2 in fact:
Canadian Armoured Fighting Vehicle Training Center.

The Canadian Armoured Corps was virtually non-existent in 1939, yet by 1945 was fielding two full armoured divisions (the 4th and 5th), in addition to an independent armoured brigade and numerous smaller units.
It owes its existence to the tireless efforts of one man, Captain (later Major General) Frank Worthington. Known invariably as "Worthy", he had served with the Canadian Machine Gun Corps in 1918, where he learned first-hand of the value of armour on the battlefield. One of the few who stayed with the miniscule Permanent Force between the wars, Worthy never tired of pushing for an armoured element in the Canadian Army. His dream was in part realized in 1930, when he was permitted to form the Canadian Armoured Fighting Vehicle School at Camp Borden [Ontario] in 1930.
Originally equipped with 12 Carden Loyd Machine Gun Carriers, this school evolved into the 'Canadian Armoured Fighting Vehicles Training Centre' in 1938, once the threat of war had driven the politicos into releasing funds for preparation. At that time, two Vickers Mk.VI light tanks were added to the CAC's strength. Ten more followed in 1939.
The Canadian Armoured Corps was largely unaffected by the general mobilization in the fall of 1939. Six battalions of the Non-Permanent Active Militia had been declared 'armoured units' as far back as 1936, but it took the Blitzkrieg of May 1940 to motivate the Department of National Defence into providing the administrative infrastructure for (the now) Colonel Worthington's armoured force. The Canadian Armoured Corps was officially formed in August 1940, with the senior units the Ontario Regiment, the Three Rivers Regiment, the 1st Hussars and the Fort Garry Horse.
The fall of 1940 found Worthy in possession of 265 Renault tanks built in 1917 and originally found in new condition in storage at the Rock Island Arsenal. They were purchased for $120 a piece as "scrap iron" destined for the 'Camp Borden Foundry', in order to subvert American regulations governing the export of war materiel. As obsolete as they were, they were nonetheless warmly received!
In the interim, plans to manufacture a Canadian tank had been underway since 1937, again courtesy of Worthy. Pressure on British industry led to the initial manufacture of the Valentine (despite Worthy's objections) in 1941, by the Angus Shops of Canadian Pacific Railways in Montreal, but most of the production run of 1,420 tanks were sent to the Russians, who declared them amongst the best vehicles the Allies supplied during the war (see the Valentine page below for more info).
The unique Canadian Ram followed very shortly, based upon the chassis and powerplant of the U.S. M-3 Lee. In return it spawned the American Sherman, which became the backbone of all Allied armoured forces for the rest of the war. The Ram also led to the production of the Sexton S.P. gun (armed with the ubiquitous 25 pdr), which eventually supplanted the U.S. Priests in Canadian formations and served long after the war in many countries.
Frank Worthington, who was once but a single voice of reason lost in the clamour of inter-war disarmament, had seen his dream come true. He ended the war appropriately as Major General Worthington and is revered today as the father of the current Royal Canadian Armoured Corps. His final resting place is, appropriately, on the crest of the ridge which forms the centrepoint of Worthington Park, the military museum at CFB Borden.

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