It is currently Sat Jul 11, 2020 4:54 am
Change font size

AFRICA - LAW ENFORCEMENT BRANCH & RANK INSIGNIA

African Police Rank Insignia

Police, Security

Moderators: Miklós Lovász, kaldi, Chuck Anderson, Pavel Močoch, Erskine Calderon, Lukasz Gaszewski, ChrisWI, Zdzislaw Rudzki

African Police Rank Insignia

Unread postby sketor7558 » Sat Oct 19, 2002 1:29 am

Does anyone have police rank Insignia from africa especially from the former british colonies Nigeria,Ghana,etc. because they have a complexed rank structure

For example the nigerian police

* The Inspector-General of Police
* The Deputy Inspector-General of Police
* The Asst. Inspector-General of Police
* The Commissioner of Police
* The Deputy Commissioner of Police
* The Asststant Commissioner of Police
* The Chief Superintendent of Police
* The Superintendent of Police
* The Asst. Superintendent of Police
* The Inspector of Police
* Sergeant Major
* Sergeants
* Corporals
* Constables
sketor7558
ADMINISTRATOR
ADMINISTRATOR
 
Posts: 718
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 8:44 pm
Location: New York

?

Unread postby kenneth » Tue Jun 15, 2004 8:59 am

Are you looking for only state police or local police as well?
kenneth
VISITOR
VISITOR
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 8:46 am
Location: Durban

Unread postby ChrisWI » Tue Jun 15, 2004 11:24 am

I think any sort of law enforcement, customs, park ranger, corrections, etc rank insignia from Africa. We have almost no non-military rank insignia from Africa.
ChrisWI
ADMINISTRATOR
ADMINISTRATOR
 
Posts: 1806
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 8:09 pm
Location: West Islip,New York,United States

Unread postby Luke » Tue Jun 15, 2004 5:49 pm

Rank Structure Sierra Leone Police

IGP = Inspector General of Police
Deputy IGP
Assistant IG’s
Chief Superintendent
Superintendent
ASP
Inspector
Sergeant
Constable

208.184.9.173/bahpre/presentation%2013-10-2003/sierra/fRANCISMUNU%20BAHARIAN%202003.ppt


After the end of the civil war, the present Inspector-General of Police, Mr Keith Biddle, was first sent to Sierra Leone from the UK, to provide emergency support to the ailing Sierra Leone Police. Such support was overdue for a police department that had been run down by years of war, and undermined by a culture of corruption, exacerbated by the neglect of successive governments who had systematically starved the police of the most basic resources. After a stint as Commissioner of Police, Mr Biddle took over as Inspector-General (I-G) of Sierra Leone's police force in July 1999.

The pre-war strength of the SLP was 9,317, comprising a majority of unarmed general duties officers and a paramilitary Special Service Division (SSD). Approximately 900 members of the SLP were killed in the ensuing ten years of war, and a considerable number suffered the amputation of limbs by the rebels. The SLP's strength was reduced to a low of 6,600, after which it has seen a slow build-up to the present strength of some 6,900.

http://www.iss.co.za/Pubs/Monographs/No68/Chap8.html


THE INITIAL RANK structure, which consisted eighteen ranks, has been reduced to ten. The reason being that there was no clear job description. For example, the Corporals and Sergeants were seen to be performing the same duties. The Sub Inspector, Inspector and Chief Inspectors also had this problem.

http://www.cmetfreetown.org/Media/Print ... 600-05.stm


Picture of the IGP Mr. Biddle, to some extent showing his rank insignia: http://www.sierra-leone.org/newsmaker-keithbiddle.jpg
User avatar
Luke
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
 
Posts: 1636
Joined: Thu May 06, 2004 6:06 pm
Location: Sweden

Unread postby sketor7558 » Tue Jun 15, 2004 8:42 pm

Sergeant- Silver chevrons outlined in black

Inspector-2 silver pips

Assistant Superintendent-3 silver pips

Superintendent-Sierra leone Coat of Arms

Chief Superintendent-Coat of Arms and silver pip

Assistant Inspector General- Coat of Arms and Crossed tipstaves

Deputy Inspector General-Coat of Arms and a silver pip and crossed tipstaves

Inspector General of Police-Coat of Arms and 2 silver pips and crossed tipstaves

all in black epaulettes from inspector up
Last edited by sketor7558 on Mon Jul 12, 2004 9:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
sketor7558
ADMINISTRATOR
ADMINISTRATOR
 
Posts: 718
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 8:44 pm
Location: New York

Unread postby kenneth » Wed Jun 16, 2004 2:24 pm

ChrisWI
I have the Badges of rank for the Durban City police Force which was primarily used between the 1850 and 2000. I also have the new Badges of rank used by the Durban Metropolitan police Service as from 2000. I have triedto upload them but seem to have difficulty, maybe I am doing it incorrectly. They are placed on a MS word page and I don't seem to be able to upload rthem, Help!
kenneth
VISITOR
VISITOR
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 8:46 am
Location: Durban

Durban City Police badges of Rank (1854-2000)

Unread postby kenneth » Wed Jun 16, 2004 2:44 pm

I will try again
kenneth
VISITOR
VISITOR
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 8:46 am
Location: Durban

Unread postby Zdzislaw Rudzki » Wed Jun 16, 2004 2:52 pm

send it to me via e-mail and I'll try to make it available to all
pls use the address z.rudzki@zep.pl
Zdzislaw Rudzki
ADMINISTRATOR
ADMINISTRATOR
 
Posts: 324
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 8:42 pm
Location: Warsaw Poland

Unread postby ChrisWI » Wed Jun 16, 2004 3:32 pm

Thanks Ken, I will be waiting ... was the Durban City Police the oldest police force in South Africa?
ChrisWI
ADMINISTRATOR
ADMINISTRATOR
 
Posts: 1806
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 8:09 pm
Location: West Islip,New York,United States

Durban City Police

Unread postby kenneth » Wed Jun 16, 2004 3:39 pm

Hi Chris
Yes it has been said that it was the oldest established Police Force in the southern Hemisphere, but at this stage I am unsure. It was based on the British colonial policing structure. It did very well for the city of Durban.

I will give you a short expose of what has happened so far, that is the transformation from the DCP to the Durban Metropolitan Police Service:-:-


Municipal Policing in South Africa, Development and Challenges
This monograph traces the origins and development of municipal policing in South Africa from the infamous 'municipal police' in apartheid South Africa's townships, to the respected Durban City Police–a self-styled British constabulary that operated in the city from 1854 to 2000 when it was replaced by the Durban Metropolitan Police Service, established under the South African Police Service Amendment Act No 83 of 1998 which allows any municipality to apply for the establishment of a municipal police service.
Following the example of the Durban Metro Council, most of the other metros in South Africa are in various stages of establishing their own police service. Politicians have generated extensive media coverage and public interest in municipal policing and some have made extravagant promises about the contribution that municipal policing will make to reduce crime. Given that most existing municipal police services are focusing largely on traffic enforcement or on work in only certain parts of the city, those expectations are unlikely to be met in the short term.

This monograph aims to clarify the functions of a municipal police service and the challenges they are likely to face in fulfilling these. The monograph is based on research carried out independently by the authors over a period of several years. It provides an up-to-date picture of developments in Durban, Johannesburg, Pretoria and Cape Town, as well as the complex, lengthy and costly process required for establishing a municipal police service.

The statutory functions of a municipal police service (MPS) are traffic policing, policing of municipal bylaws and regulations and preventing crime. The MPS will not conduct criminal investigations. After arresting any person on suspicion of having committed a criminal offence, the arrested person will be taken to a SAPS police station as soon as possible. This interface between the MPS and the SAPS will be critical

Some of the key challenges facing South African cities in the establishment of metropolitan police services are:
 Clarifying the role and mandate of the MPS particularly as it relates to crime prevention and co-ordination with the SAPS.

 Balancing enforcement and crime prevention activities. Both of these activities are equally weighted in the legislative mandate to metropolitan police services. Existing MPS's are focussing almost entirely on traffic enforcement and traditional law enforcement methods of combating crime, with little attention given to prevention.

 Determining the extent to which MPS officers will act as 'peace officers' and enforce bylaws and legislation. This will involve determining the range of legislation which municipal police officers will have to enforce, and ensuring that they are sufficiently skilled to perform all these functions. Training in crime prevention and enforcement of bylaws and legislation (other than traffic legislation) should be prioritised.

 Transforming the organisational culture from specialist enforcement (such as traffic or planning enforcement) to more generalist community policing approaches. The MPS will face a steep learning curve in building effective community partnerships for safety.

 Financing a MPS. Municipalities wishing to establish Metro Police Services will need to find increased resources for public safety provision, without direct financial assistance from the national fiscus. In some municipalities, additional levies have been proposed. It remains to be seen whether local ratepayers will be willing to pay more in order to have a local police service.

 Dealing with demands to include former combatants. Many municipalities are facing political pressure to incorporate former members of the liberation armies in their new police services. This issue has already been faced by the SAPS, without much success.

 Ensuring political independence of local police services. The SAPS has undergone a painful process of transformation over the past decade, central to which has been the idea of de-politicising the police function in South Africa. Elected councillors and executive mayors will need to learn the same lessons about reducing political interference in operational policing as have their counterparts in the national and provincial legislatures.

 The effective enforcement of bylaws. Bylaw enforcement could be used to address the 'broken window' syndrome of urban disorder and fear. However, this will require Metro Police Officers to enforce a wide range of bylaws, and municipal courts which are able to impose strict penalties for bylaw infringements.

 Meeting public expectations. Given that existing MPS are focussing on traffic enforcement, expectations about crime reductions are unlikely to be met in the short term. The provision of visible policing, whether or not it impacts upon crime, is a central challenge facing municipal police managers. Only by being on the street, and being seen to act professionally, will the MPS make an impact on public perceptions of fear and safety.

Maintaining standards. There is likely to be a great deal of scrutiny of municipal police agencies in this early phase. This places pressure on managers to ensure that problems like bribery, corruption, excessive use of force, inappropriate treatment of victims of crime, and racism are minimised, and dealt with in a decisive manner.
kenneth
VISITOR
VISITOR
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 8:46 am
Location: Durban

Unread postby kenneth » Wed Jun 16, 2004 3:42 pm

Hi Rudzki,
Has my email come through yet?
Ken
kenneth
VISITOR
VISITOR
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 8:46 am
Location: Durban

Unread postby ChrisWI » Wed Jun 16, 2004 4:04 pm

1) I know its a silly question, espically since South Africa has a high crime rate; but are South African police armed on a daily basis?
2) Do you know anything about the ranks/rank insignia of the Natal Mounted Police of Zulu War fame?
ChrisWI
ADMINISTRATOR
ADMINISTRATOR
 
Posts: 1806
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 8:09 pm
Location: West Islip,New York,United States

Unread postby kenneth » Wed Jun 16, 2004 4:35 pm

Hi Chris
1) Yes all the South African police agencies, be it the national and Local Police Forces /Services, it is a prerequisite that they be armed. The typical handgun or side arm is the 9mm, and the 357 magnum revolver.
2) As far as the Natal Mounted Police of Zulu War Fame is concerned, I take it was a movie or documentary?
I am unsure, but I would hazard a guess that they used the lee Enfield at the time, but I could be wrong. Give me some time and I will find out for you.

Ken
kenneth
VISITOR
VISITOR
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 8:46 am
Location: Durban

Unread postby ChrisWI » Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:49 pm

I read in the Osprey books that its was based on the RCMP (Royal Canadian Mtd Police), raised in 1874. Wore blue uniforms w/ white spiked pith helmets. I first found out about them in the "Zulu Dawn" movie, about 300 NMP troopers faught in the Zulu War, mostly as staff escorts, recon, etc. I also found that they were merged into the South African Police Service in 1913.
ChrisWI
ADMINISTRATOR
ADMINISTRATOR
 
Posts: 1806
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 8:09 pm
Location: West Islip,New York,United States

Natal Mounted Police

Unread postby kenneth » Thu Jun 17, 2004 2:07 pm

Hi Chris,
I do not know much about the NMPO but see the web page below

http://scripts.ireland.com/ancestor/mag ... frica2.htm

This piece is written from and Irish perspective but it give substancial details of the NMP opf the day.

Hope that this helps
All in love and War
kenneth
VISITOR
VISITOR
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 8:46 am
Location: Durban

Advertisement

Email Converter - our sponsor


Return to AFRICA - LAW ENFORCEMENT BRANCH & RANK INSIGNIA

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron

Search

User Menu